Dylan Krieger’s Giving Godhead

A couple of weeks ago we celebrated the launch of a rather brilliant poetry collection, Dylan Krieger’s Giving Godhead (Delete Press). It was a wonderful night, with captivating readings from Dylan, as well as Malvern fave Cindy Huyser, and Debangana Banerjeem and Vincent Cellucci, who shared work from an upcoming book of translations they’re collaborating on. Check out footage from the reading below—and if this compels you to race in and pick up your very own Godhead, you’re in luck, as we still have copies in stock. You might want to hurry, though, as this extraordinary collection is attracting a lot of attention, and the New York Times recently gave it a rave review, which begins with bold words indeed—words we couldn’t agree with more:

In this new age of the carnivalesque, understatement might be a greater currency than overstatement. So if I say that Dylan Krieger’s Giving Godhead will be the best collection of poetry to appear in English in 2017, you can trust the understatement, aside from the casual assertion of prophecy. Seamlessly mixing the religious with the obscene, determined to create a new form of the grotesque that marries autobiography to personal and national trauma, Krieger’s book is easily among the most inventive and successfully performative works to appear in living memory.

In The Store: July 2017

Fancy taking a journey without leaving the comfort of your sofa? We have just the ticket! If you like your fiction dark and hard-boiled, we can show you St. Petersburg, MumbaiHavana, and Singapore, courtesy of Akashic Books’ groundbreaking series of original noir anthologies. And if you’re keen for a jaunt through twentieth-century Europe, we highly recommend the story collection Life Embitters by prolific Catalonian critic, reporter, and writer Josep Pla.

For fans of meditative mysteries, we recommend the enchanting Distant Light by Italian author Antonio Moresco. And if you prefer your existential capers served with a side of humor, you have to check out Flann O’Brien’s The Third Policeman, which Charles Baxter called “the funniest, and scariest, book ever written.”

Staff Picks: The Babysitter at Rest

Fernando recommends The Babysitter at Rest by Jen George:

Jen George is as close to being a rock star as anybody who is not a musician can be. 

Her debut book is put out by the independent press Dorothy, a publishing project, which is one of the most daring, innovative presses out there. Every story in this collection pulsates with energy that is entirely original and fantastic.

Speaking as a person who never went to college, if I’m reading contemporary American fiction I’m foremost drawn to writers that didn’t attend an MFA program. Though I didn’t know Jen George was one of these rare specimens when I started reading this book, after the first story I felt right away that this author is something special and I rejoiced. I am grateful for the rarity of this collection.

I realize in a review you’re supposed to describe the characters and “plots” of some of the stories in the book being reviewed, but part of the fun of this collection is experiencing it on your own. Kinda like trying to tell somebody why the record Philosophy of the World by The Shaggs is a masterpiece. It can’t be done, you just have to experience it.

In South Texas the expression ‘throw you corner’ is used when somebody backs you up with something (example: You: “I gotta go tell that obnoxious guy to move his car.” Friend: “I’ll go, too, and throw you corner”). I can say that reading this book, you definitely feel Jen George is out there somewhere throwing you corner. And there’s not a lot of young fiction writers you can say that about these days. Unless, of course, they’re put out by the Dorothy project.

In The Store: May 2017

It’s hotting up, and we have just the ticket… short stories for shorts weather, including Deb Olin Unferth’s debut collection, Wait Till You See Me Dance.

And for Memorial Day, a display of books that focus on themes of war, conflict, and remembrance, including Tom Sleigh’s Army Cats, which the Kenyon Review described as “a dynamic book in which Sleigh sets down his own wrestling with identity, and we are captivated by the multiplicity of selves that emerges.”

And our new t-shirts have arrived, featuring a fiercely adorable leonine design.